Preventable fire alarm initiative

Updated 12/23/21

Seattle Fire Department’s (SFD) Fire Prevention Division launched a initiative in 2020 to avoid “false” or “preventable” alarms. For this reason, the City of Seattle is introducing citations of $373 or greater beginning January 1, 2020 for preventable alarms. As a result of this initiative, the availability of fire department resources to respond to true emergencies is expected to improve.

Preventable alarms include:

Heating Devices Focus Sheet

 

Many labs and shops use at least one type of heating device, such as ovens, hot plates, heating mantles and tapes, and oil baths. Heating materials, especially chemicals, present a number of fire and safety hazards. Download the focus sheet and follow the recommendations when using heating devices.

 

Liquid Nitrogen and Alarms in University Research Space

 

This report is intended to provide guidance on identifying and evaluating potential risks related to storage of liquid nitrogen in laboratory space, and how to best mitigate those risks at the University of Washington. This paper provides an analysis of the available literature on the subject, example calculations of risk, and suggestions of best practices to detect an unsafe environment from liquid nitrogen and other cryogenic material spills and releases in rooms and spaces.

 

Safety and Program Manuals

All University personnel and students are required to follow the guidance provided in the University’s safety manuals and program manuals that are applicable to hazards in their work area and/or associated with a specific job task.

The safety and program manuals listed below were prepared in accordance with federal, state and local regulations and policies.

Click on the title to access each manual.

 

Stay safe when using lithium batteries

Lithium batteries have become the industry standard rechargeable storage device. They are common to University operations and used in many research applications. Lithium-ion battery fires and accidents are on the rise; however, the risk can be mitigated.

EH&S recommends faculty, staff and students take precautions to help prevent fire, injury and loss of intellectual and other property. The following best practices may help reduce the possibility of a reaction, fire or explosion when handling, charging, storing or disposing of lithium-ion batteries: