Pest Control and Wildlife Resources

The EH&S Public Health Program responds to concerns about pests and nuisance wildlife (such as raccoons and nutria), as well as reports of injured, sick or dead animals on campus. We respond to requests for assistance through pest control contractors, who serve the Seattle campus during the work week and are available for emergency situations.

What you need to know

For pest control service, complete the Pest Sighting Report. You can also report to EH&S by phone at 206.616.1623 or 206.543.7209.

Please include as many details about the observation as possible, such as the pest's exact location, activities, and perceived level of urgency. In a non-urgent situation the pest does not attack humans and carries no disease, such as silverfish in an office. In an urgent situation a pest might carry disease, bite or sting, such as a swarm of honeybees near a sidewalk.

Your concern will be evaluated and prioritized, and service will be arranged as soon as possible.

Injured, sick or dead animals and birds on campus should also be reported to EH&S at 206.616.1623 or 206.543.7209 for proper attention. We will attempt to obtain assistance for sick and injured wildlife, and dead animals and birds will be disposed of properly. 

Keep in mind that wildlife may carry diseases such as rabies; we caution you to never touch wildlife, inculding sick, injured or dead animals.

Services available

EH&S offers the following services:

  • Service by a pest control contractor within 48 hours of service request, during the business week
  • Proper disposal of dead animals
  • Attempt to find assistance for sick and injured wildlife
  • Consultation regarding the public health implications of pests
  • Integrated pest management, to minimize chemical use and maximize safety

Frequently asked questions

Visit the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Living with Wildlife website for more information.

Bats flying overhead, and bats that have not had direct contact with humans or animals, do not pose a risk for transmitting rabies. Therefore, if a bat is found outdoors, and it has had no contact with any person, no action is needed.

However, if you suspect a bat has bitten, scratched or come into direct contact with you or another person, get medical attention immediately.

For more information about bats and rabies on the UW campus, please see the Bats and Rabies Focus Sheet.

For more information about bats and rabies in King County, please visit www.kingcounty.gov/bats.

Contact

EH&S Public Health

(206) 543-7262
Reference Files 
Bats and Rabies Focus Sheet
202.55KB (.pdf)