The trouble with UV light in your biosafety cabinet

Does your biological safety cabinet (BSC) have an ultraviolet (UV) lamp in it? If so, it may not be as effective for sterilization/decontamination purposes as you need it to be.

Ultraviolet radiation is a form of non-ionizing radiation, and biological effects from it vary with wavelength, photon energy, and duration of exposure. The 100-280 nm wavelength band is designated as UV-C, which is used for germicidal purposes.

The sterilization/decontamination activity of UV lights is limited by a number of factors, including:

 

SAFETY ALERT for laser users

The UW was recently notified of a potential hazard for users of laser equipped microscopy equipment manufactured by ZEISS. The hazard identified by the manufacturer is potential exposure to Class IIIb laser light, which can cause serious and permanent visual impairment. All users of laser equipped microscopy equipment should contact EH&S immediately if using or possessing the following equipment:

 

Radiation Use Authorization Program goes paperless

EH&S’s Radiation Safety team recently celebrated its paperless Radiation Use Authorization (RUA) program by sending 12 banker’s boxes full of active files off for secure records destruction. 

This transition to a paperless program was part of a TAP Initiative effort to streamline the RUA approval process. With the transition to a digital record, a paper record is no longer needed, so those 12 boxes of files will go to records destruction instead records retention.

 

Gear up for summer lab work

Summer in Seattle means hiking, biking, kayaking and ... lab work! Yes, many of us spend gorgeous summer days working in the lab. While it's fine to wear shorts, skirts, sandals or flip flops outside, wearing these items in the lab can expose you to hazards. We recommend keeping an appropriate change of clothes and shoes in the lab. Proper lab attire ensures your skin is covered and protected. Even if you aren't working with hazardous materials that day, your coworker might be, so always dress to protect yourself.

Safety Manuals

Safety manuals contain vital information to maintain the health and safety of those working with potentially hazardous materials or equipment.

Any UW faculty, staff or student working with hazardous chemicals, biological agents, radioactive materials, lasers and/or scientific diving equipment should follow the rules and guidance provided in the appropriate safety manual(s).

The safety manuals listed below were prepared in accordance with federal, state and local regulations and policies.

Click on the title to access each manual.