Fire & Life Safety Survey Checklist Explanations

dangerous wiring

For additional information, please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

 

Item Number Explanation
(Additional information for survey team members and report recipients)
Specific Code Reference
Administration
Items in this section are designed to identify gaps in codes or UW policy that may require additional review and collaboration. Information on these items are gathered during the survey but will be tracked for completion separate from the survey process.
1 The Evacuation Plan is current and up to date.

All buildings are required to have a written emergency plan. This plan is critical to help ensure that your building is prepared for a fire, earthquake, hazardous material spill or other emergency. EH&S offers a template that you can tailor to meet the specific needs of your building and department.

In 2016 EH&S developed a more streamlined template to help develop an evacuation plan. The Fire Safety Evacuation Plan (FSEP) is easier to develop and maintain than the previous Emergency Evacuation and Operations Plan (EEOP).  If a building already has a current EEOP there is no need to change to the new format, but upgrading should be considered the next time the plan is due for review which should be done annually.

Instructions and the Word template are located at:

Fire Safety Evacuation Plan (FSEP)

If you would like assistance in updating your FSEP, please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Diana Zumba at (206) 616-5530.

IFC 404

2 A scheduled regular fire drill has been completed within the last year or as otherwise required.

Fire and/or evacuation drills are required annually in most buildings. Some occupancies require even more frequent drills; your survey will indicate how often you need to conduct drills. You can find information on code requirements, how to plan and conduct a drill, and a number of related topics on the Building Safety Resources index.

EH&S is responsible for scheduling fire drills for the UW Seattle campus and major research stations. If you have a preference on the time of year for your drill, please contact Adrian Santos of EH&S at 206.221.7398 so that we may add it to our planning schedule.

IFC 405

3 All evacuation maps and signs are current and conspicuously posted.

Building evacuation maps provide important safety information regarding building exits and evacuation assembly points. These maps are posted in public hallways in most University buildings. If your maps are missing EH&S may have an electronic copy. To request an electronic copy of the map, please call us at (206) 616-5530.

More information about these maps is available on the Building Evacuation Routes webpage.

IFC 404
4 All fire code permits are in place, including those for hot works.

The fire code requires permits for a number of activities. If this box is checked as “no” permits may be required for your building. EH&S Building and Fire Safety staff will contact you regarding what permits you may need. For more information contact EH&S at 206.616.5530.

Hot work operations present a significant hazard of fire when sparks, open flames or hot slag from welding operations contacts combustible materials.
Hot work operations include cutting, welding, brazing soldering, grinding, and similar activities using an open flame or generating sparks.

Hot work should generally be limited to designated locations away from combustible and hazardous materials. Smoke and other emissions must be captured at the source with some form of mechanical ventilation for designated hot work locations.

Most hot work operations require a permit from the local fire department. Permits are designed to ensure that safeguards are in place to protect against fires caused by hot work and that hot work is conducted according to approved procedures and safety requirements.

More information about hot work, including permit applications and conditions, may be found on the EH&S Hot Work page.

IFC,
Chap 35
5 The building has visible address numbers on the outside of the building.

Building address signage is vital for emergency responders who may not be familiar with all campus buildings to correctly identify buildings for emergency access and response. While the local fire station may be familiar with your building, often other stations are required to respond if the normally-responding station is already called out on another incident.

This is a facility management issue and is assigned to the building coordinator or Facilities manager. For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Building and Fire Safety at EH&S at 206.221.7055.

IFC 505

Housekeeping
6 Storage of combustible materials is kept neat and orderly.

Poor housekeeping can result in a fire hazard and make exiting difficult. Please remove items as noted in the survey report.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at 206.221.7055.

IFC 315

7 Boiler rooms, mechanical rooms, and electrical rooms are free of combustible storage.

Storing excess materials in equipment rooms can cause a number of problems, including making the equipment difficult to access and increasing the amount of material that can burn in a potentially hazardous area. Please remove items as noted in survey report.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 315

8 Combustible materials are kept at least three feet away from baseboard heaters, space heaters, and other sources of ignition.

The University discourages the use of space heaters, not only due to energy considerations, but also from a fire prevention standpoint. Each year, across the country, numerous fires are started by heating equipment too close to combustibles. While codes do allow for limited use of space heaters, it requires a minimum of three feet clearance from combustible materials, which is difficult to meet. For example, space heaters placed under desks are typically within 3 feet of wastebaskets, clothing, etc.

Also, electric heating devices must be plugged directly into a building outlet (not an extension cord or surge protector), which is often difficult. Please remove heater from current location.

If additional heat is still required you may contact your surveyor for further direction or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 315 and 605

9 Oily rags are in proper containers that are emptied regularly.

Oily rags can ignite spontaneously, without an ignition source. Special containers, which can contain the fire, must be provided for oily rags so that a fire involving them does not spread to the rest of the room. These containers limit the amount of material which could ignite and to limit the spread of fire in the event of ignition.

Containers must be kept closed during collection, transportation and storage; be in good condition; be properly labeled and be compatible with materials stored in them.

If you do not already have a container in place, purchase one designed for this use, with a self-closing lid and proper labeling. If a container has already been provided, please ensure it is used properly, kept closed, and emptied regularly. For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.
IFC 304
10

Dust and lint collection systems are functional, maintained and serviced as applicable, and adequate to prevent build-up.

Dust and lint pose both fire and explosion hazards. Dust collection systems are provided to reduce the hazards of dust and lint but the collection systems must be properly maintained to function well. Dust buildup can pose a serious fire hazard. This may include ductwork, filters, flame arrestors, and various other equipment. The manufacturer is one of the best sources for cleaning and maintenance requirements. If such equipment is installed, please have the unit(s) cleaned or serviced as appropriate, including lint traps cleaned, sawdust filters changed, bag houses serviced, or other maintenance as appropriate.

If no equipment is installed and dust or fibers have begun to accumulate, please have the area cleaned and evaluate equipment needs for future use. For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 2105

11

Fire department access roads, hydrants, and fire department connections are visible and unobstructed.

Fire lanes are paved driving surfaces constructed to handle the heavy weight of a loaded fire truck and having other characteristics, such as width and turning radius, to accommodate fire truck access. All areas of campus must be able to be accessed for firefighting purposes and dedicated fire lanes are provided and identified for this purpose. They must be kept unobstructed to prevent delays in response or locating required equipment such as fire hydrants or water supply valves. The minimum width required is based not only on the width of the vehicle, but also on a clear operational space for equipment, personnel, or even outriggers to stabilize fire department apparatus.

Fire hydrants and fire department connections (where the fire department ties into the sprinkler system) must be readily accessible. If these items are blocked it could cause a delay in firefighting operations resulting in additional damage or loss of life. Proper signage is required for crews to determine which system they are pumping into.

This is a facility management issue and is assigned to the building coordinator or Facilities manager. For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 503

11.1

Housekeeping -- other.

This section is used for housekeeping items not otherwise specified above. Your survey report will provide additional guidance regarding the finding and how to proceed. For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 503

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Storage & Seismic Safety
12 There are at least 18 inches of clearance between storage and fire sprinklers.

The sprinkler system operates best when there is enough clear area between the sprinkler head and objects below. This helps to ensure a fire does not develop where sprinkler heads are obstructed, or a fire does not rise above the level the sprinklers can provide wetting and cooling action. Sprinkler spray is designed in a manner that resembles an umbrella where the spray begins lower the further from the sprinkler head. The 18 inches clear area allows the water to spray as designed.

Please remove items as noted in the survey report. For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report, or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 315

13 Tall bookcases, refrigerators, freezers, and tall cabinets in the exit path are secured.

Large items, especially those with a large height to width ratio, can tip over during an earthquake. When such items are placed near doors or in exit passageways they can slow or prevent exiting. In an emergency situation any delay in exiting may result in additional damage or injuries. In many cases, Facilities Services can assist with strapping, bracing, or providing angle clips to provide better seismic protection. This is especially critical for heavy objects (those over 400 pounds) or those with a center of gravity more than 4 feet above the floor. A rule of thumb is if the item is four feet or taller and has a height-to-base ratio of 2.5 or more, the item should be braced to prevent toppling.

As this may require additional planning or moving of some items, your department should contact Facilities Services or a seismic consultant directly to discuss various options. Please also note that fabric straps may not be appropriate in areas with chemicals or biological agents.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report, or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.
- IFC 315
- UW Corridor Policy, adopted 2009
14

All shelves holding chemicals or other hazardous items have lips or other means to prevent items from falling.

Lips or barriers at the front of shelves help prevent containers of chemicals or other hazardous items from falling during an earthquake. There are a number of ways to accomplish this protection. In many cases, Facilities Services can assist with providing better seismic protection.

As this may require additional planning or moving of some items, your Department should contact Facilities Services or a seismic consultant directly to discuss various options.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report, or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 5003

14.1

Storage and Seismic Safety -- other.

This section is used for storage and seismic items not otherwise specified above. Your survey report will provide additional guidance regarding the finding and how to proceed.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report, or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 5003

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Electrical
15 All electrical cords are in good condition and there is no use of extension cords as permanent wiring. Equipment with motors, heaters, and other high amperage needs are plugged directly into a wall receptacle.

Extension cords are designed for temporary, portable appliance use only. They are not designed for permanent use, or for powering larger equipment or appliances. Frayed or damaged cords can overheat or short, causing a fire.

High amperage equipment (drawing more than 1400 watts) should be plugged directly into a wall or floor receptacle rather than a surge suppressor or power strip. Examples include large refrigerators, full size microwave ovens, toaster ovens, and space heaters. The collective load of all equipment connected to 15 amp power strip should not exceed 1400 watts, or 1800 watts for a 20 amp power strip. Add it up…equipment wattage ratings may be found on product labels.

Where possible install new electrical outlets to eliminate the use of extension cords. If your equipment has frayed cords replace the equipment or contact Facilities Services to have the cord repaired properly.

All non-temporary equipment must be plugged directly into a building outlet. Where possible install new electrical outlets to eliminate the use of extension cords. If your equipment has frayed cords replace the equipment or contact Facilities Services to have the cord repaired properly.

For additional information on electrical safety see the Basic Electrical Safety webpage.

For additional information, contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 605

16 Extension cords and power strips are appropriate for the load and not daisy-chained to each other.

Extension cords, when used, must be plugged directly into building outlets, not into other extension cords. Conductors in each extension cord are sized for the current carrying capacity of the wire, and wire resistance increases with each linear foot of cord. Using multiple cords connected in series results in higher resistance, generating heat and leading to decreased cord life or overheating and fire.

Please ensure any extension cords are used only for temporary, single appliance use and are plugged directly into a building outlet.

For additional information on electrical safety see the Basic Electrical Safety webpage. For more information contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 605

17

There are at least three feet of clearance in front of all electrical panels.

You must maintain 3 feet of clearance in front of electrical panels. This not only allows for easy access should the panel require service, but also prevents combustible materials from being ignited if the circuits in the panel overheat or arc. Please remove the items as noted in the survey report.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 605

18 There are no open junction boxes or exposed electrical wiring.

Exposed electrical wiring provides a risk of shock, and also exposes the wiring to risk of damage. Providing covers helps protect against these hazards.

This is a facility management issue and is assigned to the building coordinator or Facilities manager. For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 605

19 All electrical panels have a panel cover/door placed on them.

Covers on electrical panels are provided to protect occupants against contact with live electrical circuits, shields them from the hazards of electrical arcing and protect the building from fires caused by electrical sparks. To be effective, these panel doors must be closed during normal operation. This provides a level of protection in the event of a fire or electrical emergency.

This is a facility management issue and is assigned to the building coordinator or Facilities manager.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 605

19.1 Electrical -- other.

This section is used for electrical items not otherwise specified above. Your survey report will provide additional guidance regarding the finding and how to proceed. For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 605

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Entrances, Emergency Exits, Stairs, Public Hallways & Corridors
20 Corridors and exits are kept free of obstructions and hazardous materials/processes in accordance with UW Corridor Policy.

The ability to safely evacuate a building is a key element in any emergency planning. You must keep exit passageways clear and unobstructed. In Seattle, the University worked closely with the Seattle Fire Department to establish best practices for the limited use of corridor space. The results of this work can be found at the Use of Corridors and Unassigned Spaces webpage.

Note that some areas may require more stringent requirements and can be assessed on a case by case basis.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

- IFC 315
- UW Corridor Policy, adopted 2009

21 Exit pathway and emergency lights are maintained.

Exit pathways must have adequate lighting to allow occupants to see where they are going during normal operations as well as in the event of a power outage. There are different designs for emergency lighting, including lights with batteries installed that activate on loss of building power, as well as lights tied to emergency power systems such as generators.

EH&S will test a sample of exit lights if they are easily accessible, but typically does not test each and every fixture within a building. If the random test indicates there may be a problem Facilities Services should be notified.

This is a facility management issue and is assigned to the building coordinator or Facilities manager.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 1006

22 Exit signs are illuminated, in good repair, and exit sign faceplates indicate the correct direction of exit.

Exit signage is the quickest way to determine which direction to head during an emergency, especially for those that might be unfamiliar with a building or area, or if the usual path of travel is blocked. Exit signs require regular maintenance; many are equipped with light bulbs or backup battery systems. Also, if a number of different turns are required, more than one sign may be required to guide occupants to the exit, in which case the “arrows” on the signs should point the correct way. Sometimes the exit path changes and the signs are not updated to reflect these changes.

EH&S will test a sample of exit lights if they are easily accessible, but typically does not test every fixture within a building. If the random test indicates there may be a problem it will be noted on the inspection report.

This is a facility management issue and is assigned to the building coordinator or Facilities manager.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 1006

22.1 Entrances, Emergency Exits, Stairs & Public Hallways/Corridors -- other.

This section is used for exit access items not otherwise specified above.  Your survey report will provide additional guidance regarding the finding and how to proceed. For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 1006

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Doors, Walls, and Other Passive Fire Protection Features
23 Fire doors are kept closed and not propped open.

Fire doors are an integral part of the building construction designed to stop or slow the spread of fire and smoke and must never be propped open or blocked by furniture, etc. It is especially critical to keep smoke from entering the exit passageway and making exiting more difficult due to smoke inhalation and poor visibility. Please remove items from the area as noted on the survey report.

If you prefer certain fire doors to be normally kept open, they can be tied to the fire alarm system so that they close automatically when the alarm is activated.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 7003

24 All roof access doors and hatches are locked.

In order to protect our staff and students, UW policy prohibits unauthorized access to roof levels. If the door is equipped with a locking mechanism and building occupants have left it in an unlocked state, please relock the door and communicate this requirement to the department(s) in the building.

If a lock is not currently provided or is damaged, this is a facility management issue and is assigned to the building coordinator or Facilities manager.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

Best practice

25x Fire doors and their hardware are properly arranged and maintained.

When installed for security purposes, locks and latches can inhibit the use of an exit door and thus interfere with or prevent the exit of occupants at the time of a fire. While the security of property is important for many, the life safety of occupants is essential for everyone.

Door hold open devices are connected to the fire alarm system and will cause the door to close when smoke is detected. These are generally large magnets with one side attached to the door, and the other to the frame or floor. This is much safer than manually wedging or propping doors open. Fire doors are an integral part of the building construction designed to stop or slow the spread of fire and smoke. It is especially critical to keep smoke from entering the egress exit passageway and making exiting more difficult due to smoke inhalation and poor visibility.

If the door hardware or locking mechanism has been damaged, this is a facility management issue and is assigned to the building coordinator or Facilities manager.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 7003
26 Fire rated walls and floor/ceiling assemblies are properly maintained.

Fire walls are designed and constructed to be resistant to fire and give the fire department and sprinklers time to control and suppress the fire before it can spread to other areas. Smoke barriers, including floor and ceiling assemblies, help prevent smoke migration from a fire to other areas of a building remote from the fire. Both fire walls and smoke barriers provide additional time for occupants to safely evacuate a building. In a fire situation, penetrations that are not fire or smoke stopped can result in fire and smoke spread far from the point of origin, and can lead to damage in areas remote from the fire, even when the fire is quickly controlled by sprinklers or the fire department. Fire stopping these penetrations will help ensure that fire and smoke damage is limited and that there is adequate time to safely evacuate a building.

EH&S will spot check these items where easily accessible, but does not perform in-depth analysis of the integrity of these barriers.

This is a facility management issue and is assigned to the building coordinator or Facilities manager.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 703

26.1 Doors, Walls, and other Passive Fire Protection Features -- other.

This section is used for rated doors, walls, and other systems not otherwise specified above.  Your survey report will provide additional guidance regarding the finding and how to proceed.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 703

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Hazardous Materials and Chemical Storage (exclusive of lab facilities)
27 Hazardous materials storage cabinets are properly labeled and in good condition.

If your cabinets are not labeled, or if the labels are incorrect or misleading, it could lead to confusion in an emergency. If a cabinet has lost internal integrity due to holes being drilled, rust spots, etc., it cannot provide adequate safeguards to protect the materials within from hazards outside of the cabinet or vice versa.

Label storage cabinets to provide information on the materials they contain. Damaged cabinets must be repaired or a new cabinet purchased if the existing cabinet cannot be repaired.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 5003

28 Flammable liquids are stored in cabinets or as required by fire codes.

Flammable liquids stored outside of cabinets or in large quantities present a greater risk to the building and its occupants.

Quantities of flammable and combustible liquids in excess of 10 gallons (38 liters) must be stored in a flammable liquid storage cabinet. Quantities less than 10 gallons are allowed to be stored outside of a cabinet when in approved containers.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 5704

29 All hazardous material containers are clearly labeled with their contents and primary hazards.
Even if those working with a chemical are aware of what a material is, others, such as visitors and emergency responders, may not be. Proper labeling provides quick identification of the material and its hazards in an emergency.

Additional information can be found on the Container Labeling webpage.

If you still have questions, please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 5703

30

Incompatible hazardous materials are segregated when in storage.

Certain chemicals react with other materials, resulting in unsafe conditions, including fires and explosions. Separating chemicals based on their hazard lessens the risk of dangerous reactions.

Segregate and store chemicals by hazard class (e.g. flammables, acids, bases, etc.) so that incompatible materials cannot react with each other. Quantities larger than 5 pounds (2 kg) or 0.5 gallons (2 liters) will be identified for correction by the EH&S survey team. Segregation may be accomplished by any of the following: 1) a distance of 20 ft., 2) a noncombustible partition extending at least 18 inches above and to the sides of the material, or 3) storing in approved hazardous material storage cabinets. Compressed gases are addressed in a separate questions.

See the Chemical Compatibility Chart. If you still have questions on compatibility or developing a strategy to separate chemicals, please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

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IFC 5003

31 All Hazardous Materials are entered into MyChem and inventories have been reviewed and updated within the last year, and the Maximum Allowable Quantity (MAQ) is not exceeded.

The University uses the MyChem system to provide information for permitting and emergency response.

MyChem also provides the information on chemical hazards within rooms. MyChem inventories and contact information must be kept current and up to date in order to convey the appropriate information to emergency responders.

The Fire Code limits the quantities of hazardous materials that can be stored or used in an area.

For more information about the MyChem system, you can check the user guide on the MyChem webpage, email mychem@uw.edu, or call (206) 616-4046.

For information about MAQs contact EH&S at 206.616.5530.

IFC 5001

31.1 Hazardous Materials and Chemical Storage -- other..

This section is used for chemical storage items not otherwise specified above. Your survey report will provide additional guidance regarding the finding and how to proceed. If you need more information please contact your surveyor or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 5001

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Compressed Gasses
32 Compressed gas cylinders are properly secured and labeled.

It is critical to keep compressed gas cylinders secured from falling. In many cases, falling cylinders result in damage to the valve assembly which can result in a catastrophic failure of the cylinder. While a single strap will meet code, best practice suggests restraints at two locations on the cylinder, one at 1/3 cylinder height, and another at 2/3 cylinder height.

Even if all employees within the work area are familiar with the cylinders, contents must be labeled so that they can easily be recognized in the event of an emergency response. See more information at the Compressed Gases webpage. You may also contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 5303

33 Protective valve caps are secured on compressed gas cylinders when not in use and during transport.

Valve caps are designed to protect the valves; this is not only important in the event the cylinder falls, but also in case an object strikes the valve. Please ensure that the protective cover is in place at all times the cylinder is not in use, attached to a manifold, or during transport.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 5303

34

Incompatible compressed gas cylinders are stored separately.

Some gases react with each other, resulting in fires or toxic compounds. Because of this, incompatible cylinders in storage must be separated by a distance of at least 20 feet, by a non-combustible partition, or by gas cabinets. More information is on the Chemical Compatibility Chart webpage.

If you still need help in determining which cylinders are incompatible, or if with developing a strategy to separate cylinders, please contact your surveyor using the contact information in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 5303

34.1

Compressed Gases--other.

This section is used for compressed gas items not otherwise specified above. Your survey report will provide additional guidance regarding the finding and how to proceed. If you need more information please contact your surveyor using the contact information in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 5303

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Fire Extinguishers
35 Fire extinguishers are available, unobstructed, and accessible.

Portable fire extinguishers are effective on small fires, but these can grow rapidly to the point where it is unsafe to try to fight the fire. When even seconds count, fire extinguishers must be readily available.

Fire extinguishers must be conspicuously located along normal paths of travel and may not be obstructed or obscured from view. The fire extinguisher must be secured on a hanger, on a bracket, or in a cabinet/wall recess.

Remove items blocking fire extinguisher(s) as noted in the survey report.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 906

36 Fire extinguishers have been serviced within the past year, are fully charged, mounted, free of defects, appropriate for the risk, and adequately sized/rated.

Proper selection and distribution of portable fire extinguishers are essential to having adequate protection for the building structure and the occupancy conditions within. Certain types of fires, such as those involving flammable metals or deep fat frying, require specialized extinguishers. Some extinguishers may be too small to be effective, even if a fire is caught in its early stages.

Regular inspections and maintenance ensure that extinguishers will work in an emergency. Tags are provided on extinguishers so that recent inspection can be verified at a glance.

Fire extinguishers must be maintained fully charged in order to function effectively. Extinguishers are required to be mounted to decrease the risk that they will be damaged and to make them as accessible as possible during and emergency.

Fire extinguishers should be the appropriate type for the hazard and within 50 feet of travel from operations involving electrical hazards and chemicals, and 75 feet for ordinary combustibles.

This is a facility management issue and is assigned to the building coordinator or Facilities manager.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 906

36.1 Fire Extinguisher -- other.

This section is used for fire extinguisher items not otherwise specified above. Your survey report will provide additional guidance regarding the finding and how to proceed. For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 906

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Eyewashes & Safety Showers
37 Eyewashes and safety showers are unobstructed and accessible.

Emergency washing equipment must be easily accessible within seconds of a spill or exposure. If the eyewash or safety shower is obstructed, or not readily visible, this could result in a delay which may increase the severity of an injury. Eyewashes and showers are considered obstructed if they cannot be accessed without moving something or if something adjacent to the unit would make it unsafe to use. They are also considered obstructed it they have to be accessed by going through more than one door or a door that is locked.

Areas working with materials that are corrosive, strong irritants, toxic, or biohazards need to have an emergency washing facilities (e.g. eyewash, safety shower).

Additional information on emergency washing facilities is available on at the Emergency Washing Facilities webpage.

Existing facilities may be eligible for capital safety funding. To request funding complete and submit the Capital Safety Request Form.

If you have questions regarding how to remove obstructions please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

WAC 296-800

38 Eyewash/safety showers are maintained and routinely tested.

In order to ensure proper function, emergency washing equipment must be tested regularly.

Eyewashes will be noted as deficient for any of the following:

  • Unit is in disrepair
  • Unit is dirty or contaminated
  • No test label from Facility Services (FS)
  • Test label but no test date by FS within one year.

WISHA/OSHA also require eyewashes be flushed weekly to assure the water is clear and does not have microorganisms or foreign particles. EH&S will verbally encourage weekly flushing but it may not be formally documented in the survey report.

This is a facility management issue and is assigned to the building coordinator or Facilities manager.

Additional information on emergency washing equipment is available on at the Emergency Washing Facilities webpage.

WAC 296-800

38.1 Eyewash/Safety Shower -- other.

This section is used for emergency washing facilities not otherwise specified above. Your survey report will provide additional guidance regarding the finding and how to proceed. If you need more information, please contact your surveyor or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

WAC 296-800

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Fire Protection & Standpipe Systems
39

Sprinkler piping and heads are free of foreign material and nothing is hanging from or attached to them.

You must not hang or attach items to the sprinkler system piping or sprinkler heads. External items can compromise the effectiveness of the system by blocking the water spray, or can damage pipe and support rods by adding weight that was not factored into the original load calculations. Please remove items from the system as noted. For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

- NFPA 13
- NFPA 25

40 Fire protection systems are serviced and maintained.

Water based sprinkler and other extinguishing agent systems must be tested annually to ensure they will operate properly in the event of a fire.

This is a facility management issue and is assigned to the building coordinator or Facilities manager.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 901

41 Accessible sprinkler system control valves are secured or provided with tamper switches.

In order to ensure the fire sprinkler system is not accidentally (or purposefully) turned off, sprinkler systems must be either locked open with a chain and padlock, or equipped with a tamper switch tied into the fire alarm system which will send a signal indicating the system is impaired.

This is a facility management issue and is assigned to the building coordinator or Facilities manager.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

NFPA 13

41.1 Sprinkler and Standpipe System--other.

This section is used for fire protection system items not otherwise specified above. Your survey report will provide additional guidance regarding the finding and how to proceed. If you need more information please contact your surveyor or Scott Nelson at 206.221.7055.

 
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Fire Alarm System
42 Manual pull stations are clearly labeled, unobstructed and accessible.

Manual pull stations are a way to manually activate the fire alarm system. Use of manual pull stations are a key element in evacuation training on campus. Manual pull stations should be activated anytime the building needs to be evacuated. Most often, this will also result in a signal sent to UWPD or local fire department to summon help. In order to be effective these devices must be readily visible and accessible. Please remove items from the area as noted on the survey report.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

NFPA 13

43 The fire alarm system has been maintained and does not show any troubles, alarms, etc.

The fire alarm system must be maintained and inspected in order to function properly in the event of an emergency.

This is a facility management issue and is assigned to the building coordinator or Facilities manager.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 907

44

The room containing the fire alarm panel has a sign posted outside the room indicating location of the panel.

Signage is required so that emergency responders can quickly identify areas that need immediate access. In some cases, an annunciator or mini panel may be installed in a lobby or other area. These panels show a display transmitted from the main panel, but may not have all the functions available, so the main panel location must also be identified.

This is a facility management issue and is assigned to the building coordinator or Facilities manager.

For additional information please contact your surveyor using the contact information provided in the survey report or Scott Nelson at (206) 221-7055.

IFC 509

44.1 Fire Alarm Systems -- other.

This section is used for fire alarm system items not otherwise specified above. Your survey report will provide additional guidance regarding the finding and how to proceed. If you need more information please contact your surveyor or Scott Nelson at 206.221.7055.

 
Miscellaneous
45 Seismic shut off valves are provided for the building's gas lines.

This section is used for fire alarm system items not otherwise specified above. Your survey report will provide additional guidance regarding the finding and how to proceed. If you need more information please contact your surveyor or Scott Nelson at 206.221.7055.

 
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Other comments.

This section is used for other findings that do not fit into one of the categories listed above.

IFC 509

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