Heating Devices Focus Sheet

 

Many labs and shops use at least one type of heating device, such as ovens, hot plates, heating mantles and tapes, and oil baths. Heating materials, especially chemicals, present a number of fire and safety hazards. Download the focus sheet and follow the recommendations when using heating devices.

 

 

Do not block campus fire lanes

When 9-1-1 is called on the UW Seattle campus, UW Police and Seattle Fire Department emergency vehicles will use designated fire lanes to get to the scene of the emergency quickly. It is critical that campus fire lanes are kept clear at all times to avoid emergency responders losing time getting to someone who needs help.

Liquid Nitrogen and Alarms in University Research Space

 

This report is intended to provide guidance on identifying and evaluating potential risks related to storage of liquid nitrogen in laboratory space, and how to best mitigate those risks at the University of Washington. This paper provides an analysis of the available literature on the subject, example calculations of risk, and suggestions of best practices to detect an unsafe environment from liquid nitrogen and other cryogenic material spills and releases in rooms and spaces.

 

Safety Manuals

Safety manuals contain vital information to maintain the health and safety of those working with potentially hazardous materials or equipment.

Any UW faculty, staff or student working with hazardous chemicals, biological agents, radioactive materials, lasers and/or scientific diving equipment should follow the rules and guidance provided in the appropriate safety manual(s).

The safety manuals listed below were prepared in accordance with federal, state and local regulations and policies.

Click on the title to access each manual.

 

Stay safe when using lithium batteries

Lithium batteries have become the industry standard rechargeable storage device. They are common to University operations and used in many research applications. Lithium-ion battery fires and accidents are on the rise; however, the risk can be mitigated.

EH&S recommends faculty, staff and students take precautions to help prevent fire, injury and loss of intellectual and other property. The following best practices may help reduce the possibility of a reaction, fire or explosion when handling, charging, storing or disposing of lithium-ion batteries: